TIMEWELL May Doreen

Originally from Halifax, England and late of Woolloongabba, Tennyson, Yeerongpilly and most recently,

Durack.

May passed away peacefully on Friday 8th February 2019, surrounded by the love of her family. At the time of

her passing, May was almost 93 years of age.

 

May has now re-joined the love of her life, her husband and soulmate, Charles, who passed before her. May

will also be sadly missed by her daughters Lynda and Dorothy and son-in-law Hemi. May, or Grandma as she

was better known, will also be deeply missed by her grandchildren, Sian, Joss, Genna and Holly.

 

At this time May’s family would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to the doctors, nurses and support staff of

Aveo Durack Aged Care Home for the compassionate care extended to May during her period of residence

there and to her family during her final days.

 

May’s family and friends are warmly invited to attend her celebration of life service, that will be held in the

chapel of the Aveo Durack Retirement Village/Aged Care Home at 276 Blunder Road, Durack, on Friday 15 th

February 2019, commencing at 1.30pm. Following the service, afternoon tea will be served in the auditorium.

In honour of May and her love of personal presentation, the family request that attendees wear a flower in their

hair or on their clothing.

BHALLA Raj Rani.

BHALLA Raj Rani.

Originally from Kartapur India and late of Regis The Gap

Raj passed away peacefully in the Prince Charles Hospital Chermside Queensland surrounded by the love of her family.

Loved mother to Lalit and Sujata, grandmother to Upvan, Shashaanka and Akshay.

 

In loving memory of Raj Rani Bhalla; the celebration of her life service will be held in the Chapel of The Pinnaroo Crematorium 285 Graham Road, Bridgeman Downs, on Wednesday 13th February. Friends are asked to arrive between 9:30 – 9:45 Am for the service to commence at 10:00 Am.

 

Followed by Paath Da Bhog (Conclusion of Sikh Prayers) with Langar (Veg Lunch) at Singh Sabha Brisbane (Gurudwara).  101 Lemke Road, Taigum.

Helping Seniors Cope with the Loss of a Spouse

Helping Seniors Cope with the Loss of a Spouse

Many life-changing incidents can be difficult to go through, but losing a spouse is one of the hardest to deal with. Grief is a normal and healthy response to loss, but it can take an emotional and physical toll on a person, and it can even develop into depression. Whether you’re a caregiver or close to someone who recently lost a spouse, it’s important to learn how to help a widow or widower cope with loss, especially if he or she is a senior.

About Grief

For starters, learn as much as possible about the grieving

process, including the common physical and emotional symptoms of grief. Physical symptoms can include headaches, digestive issues, loss of appetite, fatigue, and crying. Emotional symptoms can include confusion, agitation, forgetfulness, anxiety, guilt, and shock. Remember that there isn’t a “correct” way to grieve, and each person will experience grief in a unique way. Those in mourning need time and space to grieve on their own terms.

Learning the warning signs of depression is important too. While sadness is normal after losing a loved one, grief should be temporary. Signs that the person may be depressed include not feeling better as time passes, emotions that interfere with routine/daily tasks, no longer taking pleasure in favourite activities, or mentioning thoughts of suicide. If you notice any of these signs, contact a mental health professional immediately for guidance.

Being There

“The most important thing you can do is listen,” Don’t worry if you are unsure of what to say. Sometimes, someone in grief just needs to talk about his or her feelings. It’s okay to talk about the person who died; in fact, doing so can help the widow or widower feel less alone. Sometimes, just sitting with the person is enough. Try to read the person to see if he or she would rather not talk but doesn’t want to be alone.

There are a few things to avoid saying, such as “I know how

you feel,” or, “He’s in a better place.” These phrases minimize the grieving person’s feelings. Also, everyone experiences grief differently, so you probably don’t know exactly how he or she feels.

Instead of waiting for the person to ask for help, offer to do something. You can make dinner, pick up a prescription, go grocery shopping, mow the lawn, or perform household chores. People are more likely to accept help when a specific offer is made over saying, “Call me if you need anything.”

Don’t Forget

Check in on the widow or widower weeks, months, and even years later. In the first days and weeks following a loss, the person is surrounded by support. However, the large support group slowly dissipates. Being there long-term is especially important for family and friends.

One widow told the Guardian that the first year is a roller-coaster of emotions, but the second year was often even harder, and year three wasn’t any easier. People drift away as they go back to their own lives. Meanwhile, the spouse of the departed needs support; not in “getting over” the death, but in taking the time and steps necessary to really, truly absorb it.

“It will become part of who they are,” she explained.

Check in regularly (more than once a month) and make a point to call or visit on birthdays and anniversaries. While you don’t necessarily have to avoid sharing about your own life, know that milestones and changes may affect your friend, even years later. For example, even something as simple and positive as you moving to a new house or your children starting a new school can stir up feelings of loss.

Losing a spouse is something that alters a person’s life. While the process of grief is natural, it’s often overwhelming. Having someone to lean on during the process is important. If you’re supporting someone who is a recent widow or widower, learn about grief and depression and be thoughtful and patient with the person. Remember that he or she will continue to need support, even years after losing his or her spouse.

© 2017. TheBereaved.org. All Rights Reserved.

 

FILER Frances Cecelia

Originally from Toowoomba, Coolum, Taigum and Pelican Waters.

Frances passed away in the St Mary’s Nursing Home Pelican Waters on Saturday 26th January 2019

At the time of her passing Frances was just two days short of her 85th Birthday.

Frances leaves behind her loving children, Gary, Brian, Karen and their partners.

Frances, or Nana as she was better known will also be sadly missed by her adoring grandchildren Caitlyn, Thomas, Meagan, Jessica, Elannah.  Who will always remember their Nana for that special relationship that can only exist between a grandparent and a Grandchild.  The relationship that tells the grandchild that no matter what dumb stuff they do or say Nanna will always be there for them with a loving smile, hug and kiss.

At this time France’s family would like to extend a special thank you to the Doctors, Nurses and support staff of St Mary’s Nursing Home Pelican Waters for the love care and attention that they showered upon Frances that made her final days as happy and peaceful as possible.

Frances’s family and friends are invited to attend her Catholic Mass that will be held in “Infant of Prague” Catholic Church 27 Toral Drive Buderim on Thursday 7th February 2019.  The service will commence at 11:00 Am.  After the service those present are invited follow the hearse to the Kulangoor Cemetery 31 Ackerman Road Kulangoor where Frances will be laid to rest.

Following the commitment, a wake will be held for Frances at the Nambour R.S.L. Club 14 Matthew Street Nambour

For further information please contact Academy Funerals
617 3261 8222 or E-mail mail@academyfunerals.com.au or visit our website www.academyfunerals.com.au

 

Also check out Frances’ Funeral Zone Memorial Page

IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO HAVE PASSED

The Management and Staff of Academy Funerals and Polynesian Funerals would like to acknowledge those who have passed during the month of January 2019.  We also offer our sincere condolences to their families and thank them for the trust that they have shown in allowing Academy Funerals to be of service to them at such a sad time.

Graeme William Jackson

Angela Mary Bussa

Elizabeth Margaret Green

Stephen Bernard Maddock

Christine Margaret Lovett

Eileen Rose Olley

Robert John Ballingall

Birgit Hugglund

John Lewis Harris

Michael Anthony Heuts

Allan John Case

Shirley Patricia Anthony

Carron Frances Lamont

Seo Prasad

Leslie Charles Green

Harry Norman Stegman

Alyx Kathleen Hardacre

Shirley Mitchell

Alan Robert Smith (BOB)

Keijo Gunnard  Roiko

Charlotte De Raadt

Vitale Boccabella

Savannah Anne Limov

Francis Michael Hemeter

Daphne May Gray

Lio Paulo

Lucy Fale

Tuainekore Akanoa Tukaroa

Harry  Tamarapa

 

Flowers Music and Symbols as part of the funeral service

 

FLOWERS

For many years flowers and funerals have always gone together.  In the early yours it was thought that the spirit of the deceased would be way-laid at the grave site smelling and admiring the flowers which gave the mourners time to dissipate before the spirit followed them home.

Now days, you can usually choose a favourite flower or combination of flowers and colours for a casket spray. Single flowers, or a bunch of flowers tied with ribbon are other options. Some people have used baskets of vegetables, sports equipment and other goods to personalise the floral tribute.

Although the tradition has been for friends to send flowers, some families prefer to invite them to make a donation to a particular charity or community service in memory of the person who has died.

If you choose this option we will ensure that envelopes for the particular charity are available at the service and that the money collected is delivered to the organisation after the funeral.

 

 

SYMBOLS

You may wish to consider the following as possible symbols to include in the funeral service.

Candles are generally recognised as a universal symbol of love, light and hope. Candle lighting during the service is always a poignant ritual.

A flag draped over a coffin, the playing of the Last Post, and the red poppies used in the RSL tribute speak to us of a person’s contribution to his or her country.

Military medals are frequently displayed as they are something the person would have been very proud of.

Another flag symbolic of the deceased’s country of birth may also be another option and may or may not be displayed in conjunction with the Australian flag.

Academic, sporting or community achievement awards tell us of other achievements in a person’s life.

Art, craft, other artefacts and hobbies show additional dimensions of the person whose life is being honoured.

 

MUSIC

Music speaks to our hearts – especially in a funeral service.

The music selected and the way it is used usually set the emotional tone of the service.

Music can be played from a CD or iPod you supply, or by engaging musicians to play an instrument such as the organ, guitar, keyboard, bagpipes, bugle or other instrument.

Choirs, singers and soloists can also be arranged for a service if you wish.

 

Coping With Grief During a Loved One’s Terminal Illness (Lucille Rosetti)

Coping With Grief During a Loved One’s Terminal Illness Written by Lucille Rosetti lucy@thebereaved.org  (The Bereaved) You might think terminal illness makes it easier to come to terms with a loved one’s passing. After all, you have time to make arrangements and say goodbye. But for many people, watching someone deteriorate due to terminal illness […]

HAPPY NEW YEAR OR IS IT???

 

 

Happy New Year  — OR IS IT?????

 

The start of a new year for many people is a wonderful event.

Full of hope and promise for a myriad of things and events to come.

Whereas for many others it is the start of a brand-new year without the person that you loved more than life itself.

 

There is nothing that can be said or done to magically take the pain away it is with us all day every day and never leaves.  However, as 2019 progresses we will all start to gradually adapt to our particular circumstances and the pain is a little easier to take as each month passes.

This doesn’t mean that we no longer care about our loved one, it is just our loved one’s way of slowly releasing is from the grip of grief.  As the months and years go by, we will all eventually return to what passes as normal and life once again takes on a new meaning.

 

Consequently, Ashley, Katrina and Andrew of Academy Funerals hope that you have the best 2019 that you can.

 

If you need someone to talk to please call us we are available 24/7 om 07 3261 8222

Have the best 2019 that you can

 

Happy New Year  — OR IS IT?????

 

The start of a new year for many people is a wonderful event.

Full of hope and promise for a myriad of things and events to come.

Whereas for many others it is the start of a brand-new year without the person that you loved more than life itself.

There is nothing that can be said or done to magically take the pain away it is with us all day every day and never leaves.  However, as 2019 progresses we will all start to gradually adapt to our particular circumstances and the pain is a little easier to take as each month passes.

This doesn’t mean that we no longer care about our loved one, it is just our loved one’s way of slowly releasing is from the grip of grief.  As the months and years go by, we will all eventually return to what passes as normal and life once again takes on a new meaning.

Consequently, Ashley, Katrina and Andrew of Academy Funerals hope that you have the best 2019 that you can.

If you need someone to talk to please call us we are available 24/7 om 07 3261 8222

In Acknowledgement of those who have recently passed

The Management and Staff of Academy Funerals and Polynesian Funerals would like to acknowledge those who have passed during the month of December.  We also offer our sincere condolences to their families and thank them for the trust that they have shown in allowing Academy Funerals to be of service to them at such a sad time.

Robert Allen

Fred Simon Burns

Beatrice Larder

Phyllis Rhoda Adams

Rosalind Mary Alexandra Blair

Gary Edward Smith

Tanya Marie Mageean

Doreen Valerie Farrar

Margaret Yvonne Fowke

Allan Steward Timms

Irene Mary Green

Paul Gerard Nuttall

Jennifer Mary Campbell

Monica Mary Roberts

John Mark Spreann

Scott Fraser Dibble

Bernadine Fredriek Neirinckx

Marco Milne-Jones

Roslyn Adele Pearson

Yvonne Gladwell

Isla Rose Sanson

Sylvia Wing Chin IP

Daryl Ronald Woods